World’s Oceans Being Significantly Harmed

This report comes as some major fishing countries have agreed to halt their commercial fishing activities in the Arctic Ocean for 16 years. It will be shameful for humanity if there is more plastic than fish in the ocean in several decades.

There’s a lot humans can learn from animals too. Radar for example was developed through studying bats. It’s therefore terrible that climate change is destroying so many ecosystems that there is a lot to gain from keeping around.

While renowned naturalist Sir David Attenborough warned the world’s oceans are “under threat now as never before in human history,” green groups on Tuesday said a United Nations resolution to end plastic pollution in the world’s oceans does not go nearly far enough to combat the problem, and stressed that more urgent action is needed to eradicate the damage before it’s too late.

Attenborough’s new BBC documentary series finale airing this weekend will highlight the crisis, drawing attention to the huge amount of plastic that’s dumped into oceans and seas every year, as well as the impact of climate change, overfishing, and noise pollution on underwater wildlife.

The final episode of Blue Planet 2 will focus entirely on the damage being done, arguing that humans’ actions are the only thing capable of reversing the effects.

“For years we thought the oceans were so vast and the inhabitants so infinitely numerous that nothing we could do could have an effect upon them. But now we know that was wrong,” said Attenborough, who narrates the show, in a preview of the episode in the Guardian. “It is now clear our actions are having a significant impact on the world’s oceans…Many people believe the oceans have reached a crisis point.”

“The future of humanity, and indeed all life on Earth, now depends on us,” added Attenborough.

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In addition to the damage done by plastics, Blue Planet 2 will detail the bleaching of coral reefs, which have served as ecosystems for fish and other ocean life, brought on by the warming of oceans; the damage done to water when carbon dioxide dissolves in oceans; and the harm done by noise from shipping, tourism, and fossil fuel drilling.

“There is a whole language underwater that we are only just getting a handle on,” Steve Simpson, a coral reef researcher at the University of Exeter in England, told the Guardian, explaining that high levels of noise prevent sea animals from communicating with one another.

Another researcher featured in the program concludes that it is “beyond question” that the damage to the oceans is manmade. “The shells and the reefs really, truly are dissolving. The reefs could be gone by the end of the century,” said Professor Chris Langdon of the University of Miami.

Consumers buy about one million plastic bottles per minute, according to a Guardian report earlier this year, and Attenborough stressed that a reduction in plastic use is a step people around the world can take immediately to help combat plastic’s impact on the oceans.