Unfinished Coverage of the Obesity Epidemic

The statistics on the epidemic of too many people being obese and overweight are disturbing. There are reports finding that — within a decade — the number of people who will be overweight or obese will be about a third of Earth’s total human population. That makes it a significant issue of public health costs, but it’s unsurprising that the corporate mass media hasn’t given this (or a number of other problems) much coverage. The latest idiocy appearing out of today’s Oval Office is too often granted precedence instead.

As is the case frequently enough, the United States provides an extreme example of this world trend of rising obesity rates. A recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that the American obesity epidemic is at a record high, with almost 40 percent of adults being considered obese. Over two thirds of Americans were also found to be overweight or obese, and of those, about a fifth of American adolescents fit in the obese range.

The costs associated with the American obesity problem have been estimated at $190 billion annually, or an amount that’s about 1 percent of GDP and nearly twice the annual budget of the Department of Education. This amount may of course rise even higher if obesity rates continue expanding.

While the costs are difficult to quantify, as it’s difficult to truly attach monetary costs to the overall well-being of livelihoods, there’s ample evidence to conclude that a lot of people being too overweight is a serious problem. It’s therefore time to more actively discuss solutions.

For starters, all products containing sugar could be required to have a daily recommended limit of 50 grams of sugar labeled on the package. That’s about the amount of sugar the World Health Organization recommends people limit themselves to daily. The sugar industry has of course tried to prevent these sorts of labels, as they represent a threat to their profits — even as the lack of them continues to take its toll on public health.

Beyond sugar being “empty calories,” there is bitter proof that an excess consumption of sugar has inherently negative effects. An overabundance of sugar consumption accelerates the decay of teeth, often causes undesirable weight gain, raises risks for a lot of diseases, and presents problems from potential cognitive damage to a higher chance of developing various consequential health conditions. A study recently released even discovered a correlation between sugar intake and worsened outcomes from cancer. The study’s lead researcher said that “Our research reveals how the hyperactive sugar consumption of cancerous cells leads to a vicious cycle of continued stimulation of cancer development and growth.”

The important point about sugar being raised, it’s also worth noting that the direct cause of weight gain is typically the continual intake of more calories than is burned off. A pound of fat is about 3500 calories, so the excess consumption of those is obviously contributing to more pounds. What a lot of people do not realize though is that a pound of muscle burns a higher amount of calories than a pound of fat does, even at rest. Aerobic exercise (such as running) is regularly seen as a way of losing weight, but anaerobic exercise (such as doing pushups) is primarily what will create the muscles that could prevent a lot of weight gain to begin with.