Regenerative Bandage Hydrogel Boosts Internal Self-Healing for Wounds

A very notable advance that should become a promising part of healing in the future.

A simple scrape or sore might not cause alarm for most people. But for diabetic patients, an untreated scratch can turn into an open wound that could potentially lead to a limb amputation or even death.

A Northwestern University team has developed a new device, called a regenerative bandage, that quickly heals these painful, hard-to-treat sores without using drugs. During head-to-head tests, Northwestern’s bandage healed diabetic wounds 33 percent faster than one of the most popular bandages currently on the market.

“The novelty is that we identified a segment of a protein in skin that is important to wound healing, made the segment and incorporated it into an antioxidant molecule that self-aggregates at body temperature to create a scaffold that facilitates the body’s ability to regenerate tissue at the wound site,” said Northwestern’s Guillermo Ameer, who led the study. “With this newer approach, we’re not releasing drugs or outside factors to accelerate healing. And it works very well.”

Because the bandage leverages the body’s own healing power without releasing drugs or biologics, it faces fewer regulatory hurdles. This means patients could see it on the market much sooner.

The research was published today, June 11, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Although Ameer’s laboratory is specifically interested in diabetes applications, the bandage can be used to heal all types of open wounds.

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The difference between a sore in a physically healthy person versus a diabetic patient? Diabetes can cause nerve damage that leads to numbness in the extremities. People with diabetes, therefore, might experience something as simple as a blister or small scratch that goes unnoticed and untreated because they cannot feel it to know it’s there. As high glucose levels also thicken capillary walls, blood circulation slows, making it more difficult for these wounds to heal. It’s a perfect storm for a small nick to become a limb-threatening — or life-threatening — wound.

The secret behind Ameer’s regenerative bandage is laminin, a protein found in most of the body’s tissues including the skin. Laminin sends signals to cells, encouraging them to differentiate, migrate and adhere to one another. Ameer’s team identified a segment of laminin — 12 amino acids in length — called A5G81 that is critical for the wound-healing process.

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The bandage’s antioxidant nature counters inflammation. And the hydrogel is thermally responsive: It is a liquid when applied to the wound bed, then rapidly solidifies into a gel when exposed to body temperature. This phase change allows it to conform to the exact shape of the wound — a property that helped it out-perform other bandages on the market.

“Wounds have irregular shapes and depths. Our liquid can fill any shape and then stay in place,” Ameer said. “Other bandages are mostly based on collagen films or sponges that can move around and shift away from the wound site.”

Patients also must change bandages often, which can rip off the healing tissue and re-injure the site. Ameer’s bandage, however, can be rinsed off with cool saline, so the regenerating tissue remains undisturbed.

Not only will the lack of drugs or biologics make the bandage move to market faster, it also increases the bandage’s safety. So far, Ameer’s team has not noticed any adverse side effects in animal models. This is a stark difference from another product on the market, which contains a growth factor linked to cancer.

“It is not acceptable for patients who are trying to heal an open sore to have to deal with an increased risk of cancer,” Ameer said.

Next, Ameer’s team will continue to investigate the bandage in a larger pre-clinical model.

Injectable Bandage Developed, Could Stop Internal Bleeding in Mere Minutes

Likely enough to be part of the new frontier in physical healing. There has long been a need for bandage-type medical applications that can heal both internally and externally.

Scientists have invented an injectable ‘bandage’ made out of a common food ingredient and nanoparticles. And not only does this material staunch bleeding stunningly fast, it also helps wounds heal more quickly.

When a person is wounded, they don’t necessarily just bleed on the outside – gunshots and other injuries often cause internal bleeding as well, which needs to be dealt with as quickly as possible.

In recent years, scientists have been coming up with new kinds of materials that can quickly plug a wound – such as this incredible sponge-filled syringe – but getting that same effect deeper in the body has remained a challenge.

Now a team of biomedical engineers at Texas A&M University has invented a totally new ‘injectable bandage’. It’s comprised of a seaweed-derived gelling agent and two-dimensional clay nanoparticles.

Together, these unlikely ingredients form what’s known as a hydrogel – highly absorbent, jelly-like substance with a super-high water content that can work remarkably well as wound dressing.

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“An ideal injectable bandage should solidify after injection in the wound area and promote a natural clotting cascade,” explains biomedical engineer Akhilesh K. Gaharwar from Texas A&M.

On top of that, the team also noticed significantly improved tissue regeneration and wound healing in their treated lab samples. And, best of all, the nanoparticles used to make this hydrogel could also deliver medication to the wound site, slowly releasing it into the body as needed.

So far, the team’s hydrogel hasn’t been tested in human wounds, but its highly promising performance means it could only be a matter of time until doctors can add this injectable bandage to their arsenal.