Selected Links for Feb. 10, 2018

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Various links from around the web.

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How to Know When a Child’s Flu Turns Serious

Daniel Ellsberg Interview on Denial About Nuclear War

The Legacy of Internet Pioneer John Perry Barlow

Climate Change

With US Carbon Footprint Set to Grow by 2050, Fossil-Free Movement ‘Our Only Hope’

To Help Save Humanity, A Six-Step Guide to Combat Fossil Fuel Industry’s Climate Lies

Climate change is increasing flood risks in Europe

Polar bears could become extinct faster than was feared, study says

Antibiotic Overuse

Insane drug cocktails in India net drug makers millions and pose global threat

Huge levels of antibiotic use in US farming revealed

50+ Groups Back Landmark Effort to Halt ‘Out of Control’ Factory Farming in Iowa

Technology

Uber and Lyft, Driving Drivers into Poverty and Despair

Early Facebook and Google Employees Form Coalition to Fight What They Built

Private Censorship Is Not the Best Way to Fight Hate or Defend Democracy: Here Are Some Better Ideas

Newly Released Surveillance Orders Show That Even with Individualized Court Oversight, Spying Powers Are Misused

Google Chrome to Mark HTTP Sites as “Not Secure” Starting July 2018

Screen-addicted teens are unhappy

Stealing data from air-gapped computers in Faraday cages

Chinese police are using facial recognition sunglasses to track citizens

Political Economy

Fueled by Broken Social Contract, Study Finds Inequality and Despair Driving US Life Expectancy Down

Article on Millennials Organizing in Unions

Amazon warehouses don’t lead to broad job growth, study finds

The Rise and Fall of the Stock Market: What to Expect

U.S. Politics and Government

Congress Puts Aside Partisan Differences For Good Of Military Contractors

Academic audit finds about $21 trillion of unauthorized military spending from 1998-2015

The threat to America’s public lands is increasing

Majorities Say Government Does Too Little for Older People, the Poor and the Middle Class

Citing U.S. Prison Conditions, British Appeals Court Refuses to Extradite Accused Hacker Lauri Love to the U.S.

Doctors floored by epidemic levels of black lung in Appalachian coal miners

Scientific Research

Scientists Rank 9 Drugs on Dangerousness by Looking at Emergency Room Visits

11 Health And Fitness Myths

New ‘4-D goggles’ allow wearers to be ‘touched’ by approaching objects

Viruses — lots of them — are falling from the sky

IG Metall Union Gains 28 Hour/Week Option

Labor unions have long been a force of good for organizing in the interests of the working class. The German union IG Metall has recently won the benefits of both higher pay and a shorter job week, which is a reminder to me of a valuable concept: The gains from technology can be used to reduce the number of hours employees have to spend at their jobs while retaining similar incomes for them. The progress from a lot of technological advancements can be shared with the general population — the upper echelon of the income scale doesn’t have to be the primary beneficiaries of it.

Also, the German codetermination laws (which provide some institutional role for workers to be involved in selecting representatives for a supervisory board of directors) have a decently good effect on ameliorating the tension between employers and employees inherent in state capitalism. Those laws are another beneficial support for German employees, but I still consider democratic worker cooperatives – where the employees together are made the collective employer – to be a superior approach for improving the well-being of workers generally.

Industrial workers in south-western Germany have won the right to reduced working hours as part of a deal that could benefit millions of employees across the country.

Workers will be able to reduce their weekly hours from 35 to 28 for up to two years to look after their families.

The deal covers almost one million workers in Baden-Württemberg state and also gives them a pay rise.

It could be extended to the 3.9 million workers in Germany’s industrial sector.

What has been agreed?

A reduced working week to care for children, the elderly or sick relatives was a key demand by IG Metall, the country’s biggest trade union representing metal and engineering workers.

But their demand that those workers were still paid the same even if they reduced their hours was rejected in their negotiations with the employers’ federation, Südwestmetall.

In return, the companies will have the possibility to increase to up to 40 hours the week of those willing to work more.

The employees will also be given a 4.3% pay rise from April, against their demand of a 6% increase. The pay deal stretches over 27 months and also sees additional one-off payments.

[…]

The agreement could be used as an example for other sectors, such as construction, telecommunications and chemical industries, where workers have also demanded more flexible working hours.